Lectures / Predavanja

Bespućima poviesne (ne(o))zbiljnosti

This programming item is performed in Croatian.

Refleksije na prvi RiKon (1997.) kroz razgovor osoba koje su ga organizirale, uz fotografije i izvorne organizatore iz udruge Aurora.

Daniel Antunović jedan je od osnivača SF kluba Aurora i Rikona.

The Stars are Right – Astropolitik in past, present and future

In a way the astrologers have been right all along – the stars do affect us. Just not in the way they thought. In this presentation I will talk about the politics of outer space that have influenced humanity all the way from earliest records to the present, with some implications for the near future.

Lars G. Backstrom works as an IT consultant at a company that only hires people on the autism spectrum. He has advanced degrees in Geophysics from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and in War Studies from King’s College London. Lars has numerous non-fiction publications in different disciplines and his Cthulhu Mythos short story The Passion of the Son of Man won a literary award in 2007.

The Traps and Illusions of Electronic Memory

Based on an inventory of Romanian web-sites dedicated to SF, the speaker formulates several ideas on losing, changing, censoring information given by said sites.

Catalin Badea-Gheracostea was born a bit before first moonwalk. Loves Michael s moonwalk. First Romanian PhD on Romanian Science Fiction. Specializing in survivalist agriculture recently.

Problem of consciousness in philosophy and science fiction

How is it possible that universe contains a first-person point of view, subjective experience to which the universe itself is an object? What is consciousness and how can this elusive phenomenon be explained? As one of fundamental philosophical problems, explanation of consciousness has yielded a rich discussion during the past decades in an interdisciplinary environment in which philosophy meets, examines and complements findings of neuroscience, psychology, information theory, computer science, cybernetics and other fields.

What are philosophical zombies and are they possible? Is it logically coherent to conceive uploading one’s mind into a different body or a machine? Can machines ever be conscious in a sense that humans are? Are “Force spirits” from Star Wars an example of mind-body dualism or not really? What are our conceptions of alien and machine consciousness?
We shall plunge into contemporary philosophical discussion of consciousness employing a number of examples from classic works of science fiction literature, film and television such as Solaris, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Neuromancer, The Terminator, Ghost in the Shell, The Matrix, Star Wars, Star Trek and others.

Aleksandar Božić has a mission – to bring philosophy to the people! Place of production: Rijeka. Operating parameters: general wonder, philosophical enquiry, aesthetical enjoyment of common and uncommon domains. Known flaws: passionate curiosity, procrastination.

Foundation’s End – what is left for us from the Golden Age and New Wave SF?

During the last century Science Fiction has evolved beyond the imaginations of it’s pioneers. Books by Cixin, Watts or Chiang offer nuanced narratives blending insight into our future development as a species with introspective and sensitive narratives, but they still stand on the shoulders of giants. During this panel we want to ask ourselves the question “What do we truly owe to the past titans of SF?”. Did “Dune” and “Foundation” leave a lasting influence on our space empires? Can we find traces of “The Left Hand of Darkness” in our modern approach to societies? Some of the answers are far less obvious than you would think.

Grzegorz Biały studied International Relations and Asian Studies at the University of Łódź and Josai International University of Tokyo. Amateur scriptwriter and filmmaker with experience in journalism, always passionate about the next movie by Werner Herzog, next anything based on Cthulhu Mythos and historical wargaming in general – the more Eastern Romans, the better. There is a slight chance that, if you were there at Dublin’s Worldcon, you have seen my stageplay “The Eldritch Accountant”.

AI & Math: If, Then, Uf

The idea behind this lecture stems from a joke that present-day artificial intelligence and computer technology is based on two types of signals – Yes or No, True or False, has power or doesn’t have power. As a math student, I would like to connect this with mathematical logic and logic gates, and see how using simple concepts from mathematical logic reveals the differences between human and computer reasoning.

Toni Crispiatico is a Mathematics student at the University of Rijeka. He spends a lot of his free time on role-playing games, leading a D&D campaign and playing Cyberpunk 2020. He has presented at several mathematics conferences and events and participated in several projects.

Trieste: a science fiction microcosm

We are a group of science fiction writers born and/or raised in Trieste. Having noticed the high concentration of scifi fans activities in our area, also compared with other parts of Italy, we started investigating the origin of this special involvement.
The relationship of Trieste with science fiction, dating back to the 19th century, continues with the International Sci-Fi Film Festival in the 60s, the first Eurocon in 1972, up to the TSS+F Festival since 2000.
In this presentation we will explore this deep relationship: contributions of Trieste people to science fiction, lessons learned, connection of a sci-fi fandom with its location.

Lorenzo Davia (Trieste, 1981) is an engineer, globetrotter and bookworm.
His stories have appeared in various anthologies.
His short story “Ascensione negata” finished second in the first edition of the Urania Shorts Award, while his “Umuntu Umuntu Ngabantu” finished third in the 2017 LGBTQI Science Fiction Literary Contest. He won the Viviani 2019 Award with the story “Il tempo che occorre a una lacrima per scendere”.
Together with Alessandro Forlani he created the shared writing project “Crypt Marauder Chronicles” for which the anthology “Thanatolia” (Watson) was released. He wrote the stories of “Mysella Fairy” published in “New Camelot” and “The Adventures of the Mysella Fairy”. He also published the weird western novel “Zaineb Tehrani”. Together with the Italian science fiction collective he published the anthology “Atterraggio in Italia”.

Crones, Inventors, and Inuit Goddesses: Superheroines of the Golden Age

Many comic book fans don’t realize the awesome power of 1940s superheroines. As the genre was just being defined, and women were encouraged to take jobs and support the war, superheroines could be mixed race, elderly, and far more powerful than the heroines of the decades that followed.
Wonder Woman, of course, had enough powers to rival Superman, and skill at inventing as well. “Jill Trent, Science Sleuth” also constructed gadgets. Nelvana of Northern Lights from Canada was half-Inuit and battled Nazis. Tiger Girl from India and Senorita Rio celebrated diversity from the earliest stories. Further, before all comic book heroines were alluring teens in bathing suits, a few writers had crimefighters who were vicious, murderous crones. Spider Widow, Mother Hubbard and others fought with ancient strength. Clearly, writers today think they’ve invented multiculturalism, but a look back at the forties show how much farther we could go.

Valerie Estelle Frankel has won a Dream Realm Award, an Indie Excellence Award, and a USA Book News National Best Book Award for her Henry Potty parodies. She’s the author of over 80 books on pop culture, including Hunting for Meaning in The Mandalorian; Inside the Captain Marvel Film; Star Wars Meets the Eras of Feminism; and Who Tells Your Story? History, Pop Culture, and Hidden Meanings in Hamilton. Many of her books focus on women’s roles in fiction, from her heroine’s journey guides From Girl to Goddess and Buffy and the Heroine’s Journey to books like Superheroines and the Epic Journey and The Many Faces of Katniss Everdeen. Once a lecturer at San Jose State University, she now teaches at Mission College and San Jose City College and speaks often at conferences. Come explore her research at www.vefrankel.com

Speed Authoring

Valerie Estelle Frankel has written and published over 80 books, at one point fifteen in a year. But how? She’ll take you through shortcuts to go from concept to product in a week or two. After this come clipart cover, formatting, and self-publishing on Amazon’s KDP, with a process she’s gotten down to a quick checklist and template. Next, ebooks on KDP and Smashwords for good measure. Then she tops it all off with free marketing on Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, WordPress, and everywhere else. There’s something for everyone in this energetic, caffeine-driven snapshot of an author’s life.

Valerie Estelle Frankel has won a Dream Realm Award, an Indie Excellence Award, and a USA Book News National Best Book Award for her Henry Potty parodies. She’s the author of over 80 books on pop culture, including Hunting for Meaning in The Mandalorian; Inside the Captain Marvel Film; Star Wars Meets the Eras of Feminism; and Who Tells Your Story? History, Pop Culture, and Hidden Meanings in Hamilton. Many of her books focus on women’s roles in fiction, from her heroine’s journey guides From Girl to Goddess and Buffy and the Heroine’s Journey to books like Superheroines and the Epic Journey and The Many Faces of Katniss Everdeen. Once a lecturer at San Jose State University, she now teaches at Mission College and San Jose City College and speaks often at conferences. Come explore her research at www.vefrankel.com

Fourth Wave Feminism

The fourth wave has decidedly arrived, celebrating women and minorities in central roles. Utopias like Black Panther celebrate nonEuropean alternate paths. Disney princesses reject the old patterns. Now women can be Ghostbusters or Jedi, captain Stormtroopers, fly the TARDIS. Superheroines have found a sense of humor. Meanwhile, self-publishing and internet platforms have dispersed with many gatekeepers and established new levels of diversity. Thanks to the speed of the internet, backlash for this new wave appears simultaneous. However, progress keeps coming. Fans are finding alternatives to the Bechdel Test and clamoring for diverse creators, even as they discover amazing alternatives to bland strong female characters and gratuitous sexualization. While these trends were already appearing in books, comics, and television, cracking the most expensive medium of film has meant real global change.

Valerie Estelle Frankel has won a Dream Realm Award, an Indie Excellence Award, and a USA Book News National Best Book Award for her Henry Potty parodies. She’s the author of over 80 books on pop culture, including Hunting for Meaning in The Mandalorian; Inside the Captain Marvel Film; Star Wars Meets the Eras of Feminism; and Who Tells Your Story? History, Pop Culture, and Hidden Meanings in Hamilton. Many of her books focus on women’s roles in fiction, from her heroine’s journey guides From Girl to Goddess and Buffy and the Heroine’s Journey to books like Superheroines and the Epic Journey and The Many Faces of Katniss Everdeen. Once a lecturer at San Jose State University, she now teaches at Mission College and San Jose City College and speaks often at conferences. Come explore her research at www.vefrankel.com

The Heroine’s Journey

Many are familiar with Joseph Campbell’s theory of the hero’s journey, the idea that every man through myth and literature grows to adulthood while battling his dark alter-ego. Now mythologist Valerie Estelle Frankel explores the universal heroine’s journey, which is at least as old. While she appears in ancient myths as Inanna, Demeter, Spider Grandmother, her journey is updated in the trials of Coraline, Wonder Woman, Vixen, Rey, Elsa, Moana, Katniss, Meg Murray, Chihiro, Buffy, Xena, and all the heroines who journey to the underworld. Rather than a sword, the questing heroine wields magic slippers, a mirror, a chalice. Only after she has defeated her dark side, the wicked witch, can she grow into a bestower of wisdom in this beloved pattern favored by readers, storytellers, and writers.

Valerie Estelle Frankel has won a Dream Realm Award, an Indie Excellence Award, and a USA Book News National Best Book Award for her Henry Potty parodies. She’s the author of over 80 books on pop culture, including Hunting for Meaning in The Mandalorian; Inside the Captain Marvel Film; Star Wars Meets the Eras of Feminism; and Who Tells Your Story? History, Pop Culture, and Hidden Meanings in Hamilton. Many of her books focus on women’s roles in fiction, from her heroine’s journey guides From Girl to Goddess and Buffy and the Heroine’s Journey to books like Superheroines and the Epic Journey and The Many Faces of Katniss Everdeen. Once a lecturer at San Jose State University, she now teaches at Mission College and San Jose City College and speaks often at conferences. Come explore her research at www.vefrankel.com

Cyberpunk: Return of the Future

In the lecture I will introduce the phenomenon of Cyberpunk; the sub-genre of scince fiction, that came to surface on the late 70s and early 80s ob 20th century. The cyberpunk movement has a strong cultural imprint on sci-fi through literature, art and especially movies and TV.
I will introduce the cyberpunk genre today, especially in the movie and TV world and show how is this phenomenon not only alive but relevant more than ever.

Simon Habjan (b. 1977) is a philosopher, public speaker and co-founder od Društvo Meteorita, society for popularisation of Science and Fiction based in Jesenice, Slovenia.
He has organized and lead numerous simposioums, round tables and lectures on topic of Sci-fi, movie industry and philosophy.

The Fermi paradox in astronomy and science fiction

The Fermi paradox about the apparent absence of advanced extraterrestrial civilizations has been bothering both scientist and science fiction fans for seventy years. I will review how the Fermi paradox has been been addressed in both science and literature, summarize explanations that are being discussed, and offer some new ideas why we fail to see advanced civilizations.

Dr. Valentin D. Ivanov (Валентин Д. Иванов) is a Bulgarian astronomer working in the European Southern Observatory, at the Paranal and Munich sites. Among his primary research areas are the dynamics of star clusters, formation of stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets around such objects.
Valentin was born in the town of Bourgas, Bulgaria in 1967. He obtained his master’s degree in physics and astronomy at the University of Sofia in 1992. He earned a PhD degree at the University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, U.S. in 2001. He became a fellow at the European Southern Observatory, on La Silla and Cerro Paranal. In 2003-2014 he was a staff astronomer at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), Paranal where he was an instrument scientist for a number of near-infrared instruments, including SofI at the NTT, ISAAC and VISIR at the VLT, and the wide-field camera VIRCAM mounted at the VISTA telescope. He moved to the ESO headquarters in 2015 where he is working at the science-grade data products group. Valentin has multiple publications in research journals, including Nature and Science.
Science fiction is Valentin’s hobby. He has published about thirty stories in Bulgaria and a few in various English language venues. He is a regular contributor to Europa SF. In 2006, together with Kiril Dobrev, he has published a science fiction story collection in Bulgarian. His non-fiction book THOUGHTS ABOUT THE SCIENCE FICTION (in English) is available in electronic form at: https://valentindivanov.wordpress.com

Past and Future of ALIEN Franchise – Will we ever really know ‘the truth’?

A summary presentation about origins and ‘bumpy road’ of ALIEN movie franchise which has millions of fans.

Marko Ivšinović is a long-term ALIEN fan who has over time become somewhat of an expert and collectioner of books, films, games and memorabilia related to the magnificent ALIEN film and franchise. Born in Zagreb in 1975, works at a pharmaceutical company as head of a laboratory (yes, a “real” job).

Law in SFF Worldbuilding

Join bestselling SF author and lawyer J.R.H. Lawless as he explores why the legal systems behind Speculative Fiction worlds are so important, and how to get them right through conscious choices.

J.R.H. Lawless is a bestselling SF author from Atlantic Canada who blends comedy with political themes — drawing heavily, in both cases, on their experience as a lawyer and as Secretary General of a Parliamentary group at the French National Assembly. A member of SFWA and Codex Writers, their short fiction has been published in many professional venues, including foreign sales. They are also a craft article contributor to the SFWA blog, the SFWA Bulletin, and Tor.com. Their debut novel, ALWAYS GREENER, is out now from Uproar Books, and the sequel, THE RUDE EYE OF REBELLION, is currently on pre-sale before its Fall 2020 release. Both books are also Tantor Media audiobooks, with the ALWAYS GREENER audiobook releasing in July 2020. They are represented by Marisa Corvisiero at the Corvisiero Literary Agency, and would love to hear from you on Twitter, over at @SpaceLawyerSF!

Brancalonia and the Italian Tabletop Gaming Scene

RPGs, Gamebooks and Boardgames are experimenting a golden age in Italy, with a lot of titles and publishers, from the indie scene to the most relevant international brands.

The greatest success of the year is Brancalonia, the “Spaghetti Fantasy RPG”, and the author actually lives in Rjieka from years!

This lecture is given by Mauro Longo.

Fantasy in Myth, Myth in Fantasy

Fantasy and mythology may be considered two sisters. How is it possible to work with elements of mythology in speculative fiction writing, especially in urban fantasy or steampunk? How easily can ancient gods walk the streets of modern cities and mythical horrors creep in the 19th century sewers?

Lucie Lukačovičová was born in Prague (Czech Republic) and spent some time living in Angola, Cuba, India, England and Germany. She graduated in Librarianship and Cultural Anthropology at Charles University in Prague. In Czech she has five published novels (space opera, historical fantasy, urban fantasy, steampunk), another five with co-authors and over 100 short stories in magazines and anthologies. She published some shorter works in English, Chinese, German, Romanian and Indian Kannada language. She works on translations from English and German. She loves travelling and collecting local myths, legends and ghost stories.
http://lucie.lukacovicova.cz/

Building bridges across the world and to the future: the transformative power of speculative fiction

Speculative fiction is often called the literature of ideas. Good speculative fiction helps us transcend boundaries–interpersonal, spatial, and temporal alike. Great speculative fiction helps us transform what we have into what we dream of.

This panel offers several examples of positive transformation drawn from the forthcoming _ФантАstika: Almanac of Bulgarian Speculative Fiction_ (https://choveshkata.net/blog/?page_id=8359). Three of them are literary; one is real-life.

Note: The talk will focus on “In the Beginning Was the Subway,” “How I Saved the World,” and “The Matrix: Resolutions,” so I recommend reading these stories in advance. All three are available in this free sampler: https://choveshkata.net/dl.php?key=d75a03ae2d17cc004eaa41bd7312813d31f33b0b

Kalin M. Nenov is a translator, editor, publisher, agent, and writer. Currently, he lives in Sofia, Bulgaria, and serves as Creative Director of the Human Library Foundation: a volunteer community preparing, publishing and promoting fiction that examines what it means to be human–and how to expand the definition. Kalin’s translations have appeared in various magazines and anthologies, most notably _Up and Coming: Stories by the 2016 Campbell-Eligible Authors_ and most recently _Compelling Science Fiction_ #15 in 2020. Many of them have been collected in the forthcoming _ФантАstika: Almanac of Bulgarian Speculative Fiction_.

Find more on Kalin’s Goodreads Author Profile: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5052829.Kalin_M_Nenov

Kalin has been devouring and championing optimistic speculative fiction since his early teen years in the 1990s. He looks up for inspiration to such writers as Michael Ende, David Zindell, Terry Pratchett, Theodore Sturgeon, Patricia A. McKillip, Peter S. Beagle, Lois McMaster Bujold, Ivan Yefremov, David Brin, Velichka Nastradinova, and Nikolay Tellalov. His latest fascination is solarpunk.

Capital Ships Lost – The Deepest Frontier, a Continuation

What happened in a year after my previous presentation on the topic at Belfast Eurocon and what changed lately in technologies used in underwater archeology.

Radoslaw Kot has been an SF&F fan from 70s, and in the other life he is a lecturer of the Poznań University of Technology. Born in 1961, a sociologist by education, a translator by choice, SF&F fan by who knows what, interested also in several other topics.

Adapting the classics for stage and other media

There were many failed attempts to adapt classical texts as a modern science fiction film or stage play. What are the difficulties of changing genre, adding futuristic or scientifical elements to well-known works and why anyone would like to make cyberpunk version of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” or bring lovecraftian stories into postindustrial world?

Tomasz Kozlowski is the creator and member of polish independent theatre group iatelier. Author of plays: “Mercutio and Tybalt are dead” (which show story of Romeo and Juliet in endless kafkaesque bureau), “Still watching” (about modern couple visiting modern lovecraftian city of Ulthar) and “Impact bias” (family drama taking place form 80s to half of the 21st century).

Worldbuilding with Sex and Gender

A talk about the amazing variety of approaches to sex and gender in real world animals as inspiration for designing alien species

Cheryl Morgan is a critic, editor, publisher and a four-time winner of the Hugo Award. She is the owner of Wizard’s Tower Press and is a regular speaker on science fiction at conventions and academic conferences. She is on Twitter as @CherylMorgan, blogs at Cheryl’s Mewsings, and edits the fanzine, Salon Futura.

Life everywhere? Science fiction vs. astrobiology

People have always speculated whether there might be other realms full of life, and science fiction authors have wondered about it, too. But now, for the first time in history, we have the scientific means to test whether there really is life on Mars, Europa or elsewhere. Let’s embark on a journey through history, science-fictional depictions and scientific observations of our solar system and beyond.

Author and astrobiologist Julie Novakova will lead us on this fascinating journey and highlight the way science fiction can help us understand and promote science, such as in the e-book anthology Strangest of All, collected for the astrobiological conference BEACON in spring 2020.

Julie Nováková (*1991) is an award-winning Czech author of science fiction and detective stories. She published seven novels, one anthology, one story collection and over thirty short pieces in Czech. Her work in English has appeared in Clarkesworld, Asimov’s, Analog and elsewhere, and has been reprinted e.g. in Rich Horton’s The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2019. Some of her works have been translated into Chinese, Romanian, Estonian, Filipino, German and Portuguese, and she acts as a translator of Czech stories into English (in Tor.com, Strange Horizons, F&SF). She edited an anthology of Czech speculative fiction in translation, titled Dreams From Beyond.
Julie is a recipient of the European fandom’s Encouragement Award and multiple Czech national genre awards. She’s also active in science outreach, education and nonfiction writing, and leads the outreach working group of the European Astrobiology Institute. She is a PhD candidate in evolutionary biology at the Charles University in Prague and likes to write popular science articles about fields ranging from behavioral science to planetary dynamics for Clarkesworld, Analog, her blog and other media. She lives in Prague, the city beloved by Kafka, Meyrink and other writers, herself included. Follow her on Twitter @Julianne_SF, Facebook fb.com/JulieNovakovaAuthor or website www.julienovakova.com.

Bringing the classic SF to the middle grade (children) literature

After conquering YA, more and more SF&F writers turn to MG and try to instill the younger readers’ minds with SF tropes – a wonderful way to create new fans. How are different writers breaking these new grounds; what’s most important to convey and what are the best ways to do it while adding as much science to the fiction as possible? And will the MG SF’s rise bring a new, more science-oriented/interested generation to replace today’s “lost” and stupidified one?

Elena Pavlova is a writer from Bulgaria, that first made her name known with “adult” books (mostly Horror); since 2013 she’s writing more and more for YA and Middle Grade. In 2019 her book Kamen And The Pirates from 5th grade received the biggest Bulgarian award for children’s books: Konstantin Konstantinov.

Fantastic Beasts and where to find them in Croatia

Scary devils and spiteful angels, fairies with unusual physical features, anthropomorphic illnesses, halves of people, small creatures, river beasts and other wonders can be found in folk tales from across Croatia. Learn more about them and other similar beings in this classical storytelling performance from a professional storyteller. Appropriate for people of Hogwarts age and above.

Srebrenka Peregrin is a clasically trained storyteller, a journey she embarked on when her kids were small, which means for over ten years. She started honing her theoretical knowledge back in college, where she defended her graduate thesis on the subject of the contemporary functions of fairy tale characters. Since then she has attended and held many storytelling and writing seminars. She performs at libraries, schools, kindergartens, various cultural and tourist events and SF conventions. She is also a writer and has published several stories in domestic and foreign publications.

FlyCon

The first online international SF convention was very different to conventions in 2020. One of the three co-convenors will talk about it, warts and all.

Dr Gillian Polack is a writer, historian and general geek.

Do Humans Behave like Electric Sheep?

Take a random human. What’s going on inside its mind? Is it rational? What does it want? Try predicting its actions. Can you control it?

Add another human. See how they interact. Do they agree on reality? Add another one. And another. Keep going until something changes. Did they form groups?

Connect them through digital technologies. What could go wrong? Maybe some algorithms could help?

Join me with your body, mind and smartphone in an interactive lecture doing all of the above. We’ll explore how cognitive psychology, neuroscience and systems theory helps us to make sense of what can direct, divert and correct our collective movements.

I hope this escalates quickly, my dear and willing flock.

Nikola Serdarević started studying physics even though he still hasn’t finished studying psychology. Very consistently inconsistent, he has almost completed the School for Cybernetics and Systemic Therapy. He has been working in the Terra Association for five years and he runs workshops in various institutions, schools, colleges and prisons. He is a fan and past and future writer of science fiction and he can often be found spreading his wisdom at Rikon and other conventions.

Driverless Cars

How far away are driverless cars? IF they happen how will they change the world?

Richard Stephenson has been attending scinefiction convetions for about 2 years. Is a telecoms engineer and runs a poetry club.

Female Monstrosity in Star Trek

As the longest-running SF tv series, Star Trek provides a unique opportunity to examine questions of sociology, politology, culture, and gender. In my presentation, I focus on female monsters to explore a new aspect of female representation in the series. Based on psychoanalytic theories and gender studies.

I analyze in greater depth five characters from the Original Series and The Next Generation and Discovery. The presentation is appealing for anyone who is interested in Star Trek and would like to look at the series from a new point of view.

My name is Eva Vancsó. I started dealing with science fiction as an editor and translator of novels and short stories. I am doing my Ph.D. on the representation of woman in American science fiction television series, the topic of my dissertation is female monstrosity in the televisions series Star Trek. Besides my studies, I regularly give lectures on the theory and history of science fiction, teach genre theory in creative writing schools and I am the secretary of Hungarian Writer’s Association Science Fiction department, where my task is to organize monthly events.

To Oldly Go

What will we find when we look at representations of age and aging in Star Trek over the past 50 years? This is a fast-moving and interesting presentation spanning a large amount of the core Star Trek experience, supported by a set of slides full of fun Star Trek imagery across the years.

Sylvia Spruck Wrigley is a speculative-fiction author and independent scholar based in Tallinn. She was nominated for a Nebula Award in 2014 and her short stories have been translated into more than a dozen languages. Her science fiction and fantasy has been translated into over a dozen languages. She has been writing full-time since 2016, including bespoke near-future science fiction for Thales and NATO for internal projects. Find out more about her work on Old Women in Science Fiction by joining the mailing list at https://intrigue.co.uk.

Shipbuilding: space travel in European sci-fi film before World War II

The most interesting things in SF film before WWII took place in Europe. After Melies hit the eye, three films tackled the topic of space travel: “Aelita” by Yakov Protazanov, “Woman in the Moon” by Fritz Lang and “Things to come” by William Cameron Menzies. How is space travel portrayed in those films? How is it connected with the state of society and political unrest?

Aleksandar Žiljak is a writer, illustrator, translator and editor. He was born in Zagreb in 1963, holds a Master’s Degree in computer sciences and is a freelance artist. He is the author of five fantastic novels and several short story collections. He has received multiple SFera Awards and he is also famous as a lecturer at conventions.